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Contrasting plans for Universal Health Coverage: Chile and Costa Rica

Civil society groups at the recent World Health Assembly criticized the continued focus on insurance schemes in the push for Universal Health Coverage (UHC), which all too often includes significant private sector participation. Evidence to support the claim for private sector involvement of this kind remains extremely thin and a new study by the Municipal Services Project shows it could jeopardize public health in the South.

The study compares health outcomes in Chile and Costa Rica, two countries that have come to epitomize contrasting approaches to ‘Universal Health Coverage’ in Latin America. Chile’s focus has been on insurance-based UHC while Costa Rica has built a single public health system. The research provides strong evidence to show that there are widespread and consistent advantages to promoting UHC through a strong public system that funds and provides all medical and preventive services to citizens rather than through a fragmented public-private mix.

It is important to note that both countries have achieved the lowest infant mortality rates and the highest life expectancies in the region thanks to major advances in primary care. But Chile’s health ‘market’ has led to inefficient use of resources, with higher administrative costs and more irrational medical procedures (e.g. caesareans) resulting from oligopolies and collusion among private providers.

One of the major goals of UHC is financial protection for poor households when they face illness. Yet Chileans systematically need to make higher out-of-pocket payments to get medical care in comparison with Costa Ricans. This situation is produced in part by the fact that Chileans pay for health conditions, services or products that are not covered by their insurance (e.g. prescription drugs).

In contrast, Costa Rica’s public health care system remains relatively affordable and more efficient, with total per capita health expenditure standing at US$811 compared to US$947 in Chile. Importantly, Costa Rica has also consistently prioritized preventive health care. Expenditure on prevention and public health services from 2002-2006 in Costa Rica is more than double that of Chile (6-7% vs 2-3%). This focus on prevention is more cost-effective and can yield greater public health impacts in the long term.

Using comparable data (Latinobarómetro), the Municipal Services Project study shows that twice as many people reported facing access barriers to health care in Chile compared to Costa Rica, citing distance to hospital, time to obtain an appointment, and cost of seeing a doctor as the major reasons. In addition, lack of access to health services as a result of financial barriers in Chile still stands at 4.2% compared to 0.8% in Costa Rica.

Costa Ricans continue to be largely satisfied with the quality of their healthcare services, more so than Chileans. Interestingly, LAPOP 2012 results show that most people in both countries think that government, rather than the private sector, should be responsible for health care (71.1% in Chile and 67.5% in Costa Rica).

According to the notions of “active purchasing” and “managed competition” – frequently used to promote insurance schemes – the existence of different providers competing for resources should have produced higher levels of quality at lower costs in Chile. The evidence presented in this report shows that such assumptions are not always true.
 
The Chilean health system is an example of how segmentation produced by the coexistence of private and public insurances is detrimental to efficiency and equity. Collusion among private providers and oligopolies are realities that are ignored in the competition argument.

Debates over the best institutional arrangements to organize universal health care are far from over, but this case study demonstrates that insurance schemes as promoted by some proponents of the UHC agenda are neither the only nor the best option.

Luis Ortiz Hernández is Professor in the Health Care Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Xochimilco, Mexico and visiting professor at Queen’s University, Canada. His most recent publication, “Chile and Costa Rica: Different roads to universal health in Latin America,” is available here.

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New World Bank and WHO targets announced on health coverage for the poorest 40%

At a high-level meeting in Tokyo a couple of weeks ago World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim was unequivocal – “achieving universal health coverage and equity in health are central to reaching the [World Bank] global goals to end extreme poverty by 2030 and boost shared prosperity.”

Kim’s emphasis on equity and the need to prioritize policies that actively redistribute resources and reduce disparities in health coverage marks a crucial and welcome turning point for the World Bank. As Oxfam argued in a recent paper, UHC reforms must be explicit about reducing inequality in access to health services, so that everyone has the same financial protection and access to the same range of high quality health services – according to need and not their ability to pay. Equity must be designed into the system from the beginning with governments and donors ensuring that the poor benefit at least as much as the better off at every step of the way towards universal coverage.

But by far the most significant outcome of the conference was the release of a joint World Bank and World Health Organization proposed framework for monitoring progress towards UHC. The framework sets out clear commitments to reduce out-of-pocket payments and improve access to health care for the poor with two new targets:

  •  halve the number of people impoverished by health care payments from 100 million to 50 million by 2020, and eliminate the problem altogether by 2030;
  • double the number of poor people (the poorest 40%) with access to health care services by 2020 – from 40% to 80%.

These clear targets and deadlines give something progressive to hold the World Bank Group accountable to but why set an 80% rather than 100% target? And if the Bank is serious about them the targets they should be monitored annually and included in the Bank’s new corporate scorecard currently under negotiation.  And most importantly, what action will the Bank take to deliver against them?

User fees are the most inequitable method of financing health care services, yet they continue to exist in most poor countries. Three people every second are pushed into poverty because of them but donor support for fee removal has remained unacceptably low. The World Bank should break from history and play a clear pro-active role in helping governments to remove fees and to raise and distribute revenue for health equitably across populations.

At the same time the Bank needs to be much clearer that user fees should not be replaced by health insurance schemes that have been proven to  prioritize already advantaged ‘easy to reach’ groups in the formal sector or rely on collecting premiums from people who are too poor to pay. As Oxfam’s recent paper showed, the countries making most progress towards UHC have prioritized spending on health from general taxation – either on its own or pooled with formal sector payroll taxes and international aid. Governments and donors, including the World Bank, should use the recent lessons from these countries and build on them.

At the Tokyo event we once again heard calls from Jim Kim for investment in ‘affordable’ ‘quality’ ‘health coverage’ for all, with an emphasis on ‘primary health care’. This is positive but we need greater reassurance that the Bank has shifted to a genuine focus on comprehensive primary health care for all as part of its UHC agenda. This would stand in stark contrast to its historic emphasis on ‘basic’, ‘selective’ or ‘minimum’ interventions or packages of care.

We hope world leaders listen to the clear call from the World Bank and WHO for UHC to be included in the post-2015 development framework. Universal health coverage provides the opportunity to accelerate progress on the health-related Millennium Development Goals, address the growing burden of non-communicable diseases, and most critically to move towards a more comprehensive approach to deliver on the right to equitable and affordable health care for all. This is something all world leaders should embrace as negotiations on the post-2015 development framework commence.

Ceri Averill is a Health Policy Advisor for Oxfam GB and author of Universal Health Coverage: Why Health Insurance Schemes are Leaving the Poor Behind

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Universal health: from private coverage to public care

This great new two minute video captures the motivation and the rationale for the movement against a greater role for the private sector in the health care systems of low- and middle-income countries.

 

 

The video highlights the manipulation of the Universal Health Coverage agenda to serve the interests of profit making companies while simultaneously starving already crumbling public health services from badly needed investment.

 

 

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Ten years on and major pitfalls still hindering Ghana’s National Health Insurance Scheme

As the Government of Ghana gears up its plans to celebrate the 10th anniversary of its now internationally famed National Health Insurance Scheme, Ghana’s Universal Access to Healthcare Campaign today launch our own assessment of progress to date. Our new paper explains how 65% of the population is still paying out-of-pocket in the old ‘cash and carry’ system and that at the current rate of progress UHC will not be achieved until at least the year 2076. Our campaign argues that progress will continue to stall as long as the NHIS structure excludes the very people it seeks to protect through overly-burdensome and unworkable insurance premiums.

Next week Ghana’s National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) will host a three day International conference in Accra with the theme: “Towards Universal Health Coverage: Increasing Enrolment whilst Ensuring Sustainability”.  The conference will attract Universal Health Coverage (UHC) practitioners, academia, policy makers, NGOs and CSOs in their numbers, and seeks to examine the successes and challenges of the NHIS, and elicit feedback and proposals for reform.

While the Universal Access to Healthcare Campaign (UAHCC ) welcomes the anniversary event, we are concerned that inherent pitfalls of the NHIS have been consistently left on the sideline over the past decade and if unadressed will stifle any prospect the NHIS has of achieving UHC in the near future. The UAHCC will convey this position at the anniversary conference, where we have been invited to participate in a panel discussion, but also in our own civil society forum today to which government officials and donor agency staff have been invited.

The paper launched today acknowledges some strengths of the scheme including its generous benefits package, comprehensive level of care and treatment coverage and relatively broad range of exemption categories. However, these strengths are only relevant to NHIS active members. The UAHCC calls on the Government of Ghana to act on the glaring short falls of the scheme including:

  • Lack of coverage and access to service: in 2012, only 35% of the population was recorded as being active NHIS subscribers – a less than 2% increase from 2010.  The NHIS is therefore irrelevant to the 65% of the population who still pay out-of-pocket in the burdensome and inequitable “cash and carry” system.  At the current rate of progress Ghana will not achieve UHC until 2076!
  • Exclusion of poor and low-income earners: a growing body of evidence shows that premium payments are beyond the means of a large portion of informal sector workers and constitute a significant barrier to joining the NHIS.  The rich are twice as likely to join and benefit from the scheme as the poor. The value of the premiums is in serious question – while constituting a massive obstacle to progress on UHC they constitute less than 5% of the total annual inflow to the NHIA.  There must be a shift in focus from extracting premium contributions from people who are evidently too poor to pay, to prioritising spending on health, for example through a reduction of inefficiencies and improvements to general progressive taxation.
  • Unsustainable and inequitable financial model: the NHIS was created with a solid financial base, however by 2011 it was facing a deficit of more than GHC 47.3 million.  This is due in part to large scale inefficiencies and cost escalation in the system and the continued belief that financial sustainability will be solved by increased enrollment of members from the informal sector.  More effort must be focused on identifying alternative sources of financing by tackling service provider fraud and corruption, reducing funding leakages and waste across the health system and by instituting progressive reforms to taxation.

 

 

Sidua Hor is coordinator for the Ghana Universal Access to Healthcare Campaign Coalition

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Waiting for a second chance in Georgia

Maya says: "I don’t want to die and leave my daughter alone. That’s my biggest fear. She’s been through so much she deserves to have a better life." Maya Giorgadze, 47, is a single mother, from Gori, Georgia. She has a 15-year-old daughter, Dea. Maya was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a lumpectomy but cannot afford follow up treatment. Photo: Justyna Mielnikiewicz. Oxfam

Giorgi’s shy innocent face stares out of a billboard in Tbilisi. The words ‘I have a right to live’ are printed across the frame. A famous Georgian journalist tenderly holds Giorgi’s hand, urging the country to hear their urgent call to action. 13-year-old Giorgi has just a few critical months to find a bone marrow donor to save his life.

Giorgi is part of a campaign run by leading Georgian journalists, and supported by Oxfam, to ask the Government to urgently invest in the healthcare sector, and save the lives of children affected by leukaemia. For Giorgi, the journalists’ crusade is his last hope. Giorgi’s mother, Jakhia, explains,

“We have no money. We only receive 125 lari (£48) per month from the state, which is barely enough to feed my family. We have nothing to sell, and I don’t know how we’ll cope,” she says wiping away tears.

Although the Georgian government provides chemotherapy and medicines to children affected by leukaemia, there are currently no facilities in the country to facilitate bone marrow transplants and no database to find donor matches. Giorgi’s mother may be forced to seek refugee status abroad to pay for her son’s transplant which costs around 100, 000 euros (£85, 000)– an insurmountable amount for the majority of Georgia’s population.

Giorgi’s story is representative of hundreds of people across Georgia who are struggling to access affordable health care. The health system in Georgia requires families to take drastic measures to save their children’s lives.

In Gori, the former home of Stalin, Maya, a young single working mother largely dependent on social benefits, is unable to afford the cost of her post cancer treatment. Rising food prices are also having an impact on her family and pushing health care even further out of reach. Maya looks sadly out of the window of her small dilapidated ex Soviet apartment, which she shares with fourteen other families “Sometimes I go to bed hungry at night so I can pay for medicine for my daughter.”

Elsewhere, people like Elguja, who used to be an actor, have no choice but to buy low quality cheap medicines. Elguja who turned blind at 22, says, “My pension is 125 lari (£48) each month but medicine costs 100 lari (£38). I have to buy cheap medicines but it makes my asthma worse. You can’t imagine what it’s like when you can’t breathe, especially at night.” Elguja often has pain in his eyes but cannot afford the high costs of eye medication. “I miss being able to see people’s eyes on stage,” Elguja wistfully remembers, “The eyes are the window to the soul,” he waves his walking stick like a wand as if he is playing the part of a blind man in a play.

For Giorgi, Maya, and Elguja, the new Government’s pledge for universal free healthcare for Georgia’s population, and the promise to establish a transplant centre for children affected with leukaemia offers hope. Oxfam is working to raise awareness amongst young people about their health rights and have a say in the future health care system. For young Madea, who is taking part in the project, it gives her a chance to have a voice, “Healthcare is the most important thing, especially for children as they are the future of the country. We often have meetings with municipality representatives to have a say in the healthcare system and lobby for changes.”

Meanwhile, Giorgi’s message ‘I have a right to live’ remains on billboards across the capital, a stark reminder of the urgent need for healthcare reform in Georgia. I hope that Oxfam’s campaign gives Giorgi, Maya and Elguja a second chance.

Caroline Berger is the Oxfam Regional Digital Media Coordinator for the CIS

 

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Global Health Check is edited by Anna Marriott, Health Policy Advisor for Oxfam GB, and welcomes contributions from different authors. If you would like to write an article for this site or if you have any queries please contact: amarriott@oxfam.org.uk.