Free and Public

My duck is not the only one

Ducks“The neighbours called us the duck and her ducklings” . Pearl Van-Dyck shares the story of her mother’s struggle to stay alive.

Today would have been her birthday. I remember the afternoon when my mother told me that the hospital result showed that the lump on her arm was cancer. My life changed that afternoon. I couldn’t imagine our lives without her. We were so close that the neighbours called us “the duck and its ducklings”. .

She was desperate to stay alive “I just need 3 more years to allow Jo finish school” she often said. (Jo is my younger sister) .Then my mother began the very expensive treatment at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra.

Hospital Accra

The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital

Watching her enduring the treatment but worrying about the exorbitant cost of the treatment was very difficult indeed. Both my parents were professionals with regular earnings. Yet, the treatment became unaffordable on their incomes alone. There were times when she missed treatment due to shortage of money. I often ask myself: what if she could have had all the treatment sessions? What if cancer treatment were not so expensive? Would she still be here to see my children?

My mum is one of many- according to the WHO, cancer is one of the leading causes of death in developing countries. Most affected people are simply unable to afford the cost of treatment.

The outrageous cost of cancer treatment is not limited to developing countries. Last year, NICE decided that Kadycla, a medicine to treat breast cancer, is not to be prescribed by the NHS due to its high cost. The outrageous cost of Kadcyla -£90,000 annually per patient- led a coalition of public health advocates to send a letter to Jeremy Hunt requesting that he issues a compulsory licensing to break the patent and enable generic production of affordable versions. Needless to say, that the UK will not do so.

Yet if the British government can’t afford the price of medicines, what chances have the governments of poor countries got to provide such drugs for their citizens? And how rich should a person be in order to be able to afford cancer medicines?

But pharmaceutical companies hide behind the lack of health care in developing countries as a justification of ignoring the plight of people living with cancer there. Recently the CEO of Astra ZDuckeneca claimed that free cancer medicines are not beneficial for Africans. If he looked back he might have remembered similar claims about HIV medicines when it was said that Africans cannot handle ARVs. Yet thanks to civil society campaigns and generic medicines, now 15 million people are on treatment.

Clearly African governments need to invest in health systems in order to achieve their commitment to Universal Health Coverage and provide the much needed services to their citizens. This has to go hand in hand with global efforts to decrease the prices of medicines.

Sadly my mum didn’t get the three years she wished for and I miss her dearly. But I really hope for the time when people won’t lose their loved ones just because they couldn’t afford the medicines they need. I am awaiting the report of the High Level Panel, set up by the UN Secretary General to address the imbalance between human rights, trade and Intellectual Property and access to medicines. It is critical that the HLP makes clear recommendations to the UN leaders on how to ensure that the global system for R&D results in health technologies being affordable to all patients.

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Global Health Check was created by Anna Marriott and is currently edited by Mohga Kamal-Yanni