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Waiting for a second chance in Georgia

Maya says: "I don’t want to die and leave my daughter alone. That’s my biggest fear. She’s been through so much she deserves to have a better life." Maya Giorgadze, 47, is a single mother, from Gori, Georgia. She has a 15-year-old daughter, Dea. Maya was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a lumpectomy but cannot afford follow up treatment. Photo: Justyna Mielnikiewicz. Oxfam

Giorgi’s shy innocent face stares out of a billboard in Tbilisi. The words ‘I have a right to live’ are printed across the frame. A famous Georgian journalist tenderly holds Giorgi’s hand, urging the country to hear their urgent call to action. 13-year-old Giorgi has just a few critical months to find a bone marrow donor to save his life.

Giorgi is part of a campaign run by leading Georgian journalists, and supported by Oxfam, to ask the Government to urgently invest in the healthcare sector, and save the lives of children affected by leukaemia. For Giorgi, the journalists’ crusade is his last hope. Giorgi’s mother, Jakhia, explains,

“We have no money. We only receive 125 lari (£48) per month from the state, which is barely enough to feed my family. We have nothing to sell, and I don’t know how we’ll cope,” she says wiping away tears.

Although the Georgian government provides chemotherapy and medicines to children affected by leukaemia, there are currently no facilities in the country to facilitate bone marrow transplants and no database to find donor matches. Giorgi’s mother may be forced to seek refugee status abroad to pay for her son’s transplant which costs around 100, 000 euros (£85, 000)– an insurmountable amount for the majority of Georgia’s population.

Giorgi’s story is representative of hundreds of people across Georgia who are struggling to access affordable health care. The health system in Georgia requires families to take drastic measures to save their children’s lives.

In Gori, the former home of Stalin, Maya, a young single working mother largely dependent on social benefits, is unable to afford the cost of her post cancer treatment. Rising food prices are also having an impact on her family and pushing health care even further out of reach. Maya looks sadly out of the window of her small dilapidated ex Soviet apartment, which she shares with fourteen other families “Sometimes I go to bed hungry at night so I can pay for medicine for my daughter.”

Elsewhere, people like Elguja, who used to be an actor, have no choice but to buy low quality cheap medicines. Elguja who turned blind at 22, says, “My pension is 125 lari (£48) each month but medicine costs 100 lari (£38). I have to buy cheap medicines but it makes my asthma worse. You can’t imagine what it’s like when you can’t breathe, especially at night.” Elguja often has pain in his eyes but cannot afford the high costs of eye medication. “I miss being able to see people’s eyes on stage,” Elguja wistfully remembers, “The eyes are the window to the soul,” he waves his walking stick like a wand as if he is playing the part of a blind man in a play.

For Giorgi, Maya, and Elguja, the new Government’s pledge for universal free healthcare for Georgia’s population, and the promise to establish a transplant centre for children affected with leukaemia offers hope. Oxfam is working to raise awareness amongst young people about their health rights and have a say in the future health care system. For young Madea, who is taking part in the project, it gives her a chance to have a voice, “Healthcare is the most important thing, especially for children as they are the future of the country. We often have meetings with municipality representatives to have a say in the healthcare system and lobby for changes.”

Meanwhile, Giorgi’s message ‘I have a right to live’ remains on billboards across the capital, a stark reminder of the urgent need for healthcare reform in Georgia. I hope that Oxfam’s campaign gives Giorgi, Maya and Elguja a second chance.

Caroline Berger is the Oxfam Regional Digital Media Coordinator for the CIS

 

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One Response to “Waiting for a second chance in Georgia”

  1. Caroline Berger says:

    Since this story was published, Giorgi sadly passed away to leukemia but I hope his story highlights the urgent need for healthcare reform in Georgia.

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Global Health Check is edited by Anna Marriott, Health Policy Advisor for Oxfam GB, and welcomes contributions from different authors. If you would like to write an article for this site or if you have any queries please contact: amarriott@oxfam.org.uk.