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Lost in translation: reflections from the 20th International AIDS Conference (July 2014) By Gracia Violeta Ross: UNITAID Board Member for Communities Living and Affected by HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria

With great enthusiasm I started my 33 hours flight from Bolivia to the big country-continent: Australia. But my first night in Melbourne was filled with tears as I turned on the television and heard of the attack to the Malaysian flight MH17.

The opening ceremony of the 20th International AIDS Conference paid respect to the scientists and advocates who died in this tragedy. Throughout the conference, almost all plenary speakers spoke about the “now more than ever” feeling and the importance of Stepping Up the Pace of the AIDS response. In this blog I share some of my reflections from my week in Melbourne.

The highlights

• I was reinvigorated by the effective activism on Hepatitis and HIV as activists protested against the hypocrisy of the big pharmaceutical industry pricing life-saving medicine beyond the means of people and governments

• It was interesting to learn about the issue of “Grey HIV” as we are seeing people living with HIV getting older in developing countries. Getting old with medications and with HIV looks scary for me because I am also living with HIV and I am already 37!

• It was inspiring to hear daring talks about sexuality in conservative contexts such as those in some Muslims countries and Christian conservative settings. I was pleased to hear that faith leaders are increasingly tackling this issue and talking to their peers

• Although the theme of the conference was “No one left behind”, I heard a lot of the discourse of “shared responsibility” in the AIDS response. Ultimately, this is the idea that countries will have to “find your own funding”. For Middle Income Countries (MICs), the pressure is already mounting and there is a real risk that these countries will be left behind

• I did not hear a lot about women and girls as a key population and the links to gender based violence and HIV. Moreover the debate on vulnerability to HIV infection and impact must recognize that each community and country has its own vulnerabilities that need to be considered in AIDS response

• Children living and affected by HIV were notably absent and this is a fundamental mistake, given the fact that this group is really voiceless and vulnerable. There are huge gaps in the coverage of treatment for HIV and TB for children. I am really enthusiastic about UNITAID because it invests in shaping the market for diagnosis and treatment of children

• As someone coming from Latin America, I felt the strong absence of my region, not only in that very few delegates from Latin American and the Caribbean were present, but also in the fact that the UNAIDS’ “global analysis” included incomplete data from these two regions. At the conference, I realized that there is much misunderstanding about Latin America and the Caribbean. Some donor countries seem to believe these two regions have universal coverage of treatment and prevention services. The reality is that Latin American countries vary a lot and there is huge inequality and disparity.

At the end, I left Melbourne without seeing the sun nor one Kangaroo!

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